member updates

MEMBER UPDATES


Michelle Facos received an ACLS fellowship for 2017-18 in order to continue her research on the Copenhagen Academy circa 1800.
Facos and Bart Pushaw are organizing a conference, ‘Visual Culture Exchange Across the Baltic Sea Region 1772-1918’, to be held at the Alfred Krupp Wissenschaftskolleg Greifswald and co-sponsored by the University of Greifswald 15-17 June; HGSCEA member Thor J. Medick will be one of the keynote speakers.


Steven Mansbach was named Distinguished University Professor, the highest honor bestowed on a faculty person at the University of Maryland, on September 14, 2016.


Vivian Barnett organized the Alexei Jawlensky retrospective which will open at the Neue Galerie in New York in February 2017. She is also preparing a Franz Marc and August Macke exhibition for autumn 2018 at the Neue Galerie.


Annie Bourneuf’s (Assistant Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago) book Paul Klee: The Visible and the Legible (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015) was awarded the 2016 Robert Motherwell Book Award. She gave gave a paper on Quaytman’s discovery of the engraved portrait of Luther nested in Klee’s Angelus Novus at the colloquium Paul Klee—Regards nouveaux hosted by the Centre Pompidou in May this year.


Eric Anderson (Associate Professor, History of Art and Visual Culture, RISD) will be spending the spring term 2017 in Vienna as Fulbright-Freud Visiting Scholar at the Sigmund Freud Museum. He will be giving several lectures related to this research: “Freud’s Colors: Design and Psychology in Nineteenth-Century Vienna” at the Middlebury College Museum of Art, October 10, 2016; and “Dreams in Red: Color and the Interior from Goethe to Freud” at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, April 27, 2016. He will also be participating in a symposium at the China Design Museum in Hangzhou called “The Bauhaus and Modern Western Design,” November 14-18, 2016. His lecture will there will be titled “Museums and Design Reform in the Nineteenth Century: Vienna and Beyond.”


Esra Akcan received the 2016-17 Berlin Prize, American Academy in Berlin, Fall 2016


Mark Haxthausen is retired—from teaching. He is now the Robert Sterling Clark Professor of Art History Emeritus!


Juliet Koss (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Art History, Scripps College, Claremont) chaired the HGSCEA Emerging Scholars session at CAA in DC in February 2016. In spring 2016 she is a Clark Fellow at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, writing a book entitled “Model Soviets.”


Dorothy Price, Reader in the History of Art at the University of Bristol, UK, co-convened (with Camilla Smith) a session at the 41st Annual Association of Art Historians Conference at UEA Norwich in April 2015 on ‘Weimars Other: Visual Culture in Germany after 1918’. She also delivered a lecture at the Pratt Institute New York in April 2015 entitled ‘Narrating Weimar Women’s Photographic Identities’ and has recently contributed to the Neue Galerie’s current exhibition and catalogue Berlin Metropolis 1918-1933 with a catalogue essay on ‘The New Woman in 1920s Berlin’ (published October 2015). She is currently preparing two new monographs, one provisionally entitled Käthe Kollwitz: Between Expressionism and Symbolism, the other Icons of Modernity: Women and Photography in Weimar Germany whilst in the planning stages of a major new exhibition German Expressionism: The Cult of Youth co-curated with Drs Jill Lloyd, Christian Weikop and Adrian Locke for the Royal Academy of Arts, London, Spring 2019.


Rosemarie Bletter, Professor Emerita, Graduate Center, CUNY, gave a talk in the session “Fantastic Architecture: Berlin’s Expressionist Heritage” and responded to Christoph Rauhut’s book Fragments of Metropolis Berlin (2015), Goethe Institute, New York University, June 11, 2015.


Peter Chametzky, Professor of Art History, delivered the Festvortrag (Keynote Lecture), “Revising and Refunctioning as Restitution,” (in German), at the opening ceremony for the inaugural exhibition of the Kunsthaus Dahlem museum in Berlin on June 11, 2015. His chapter “Postcards on the Edge in Nazi Germany,” is forthcoming in “Carte Postale et Création,” ed. Isabelle Ewig, Emmanuel Guigon, Line Herbert-Arnaud (Presses de l’Université Paris Sorbonne: PUPS, 2015.


Marsha Morton, Professor, Pratt Institute, delivered a paper, “Picturing the Perils of Finance Capitalism: German Illustrators and the 1873 Crash,” at the conference “The Illustration Research Symposium: The Illustrator as Public Intellectual,’ November 5-7, 2015 at the Rhode Island School of Design. 


Linda McGreevy, Professor Emerita, Old Dominion University, is continuing to work on the biography of Kaethe Kollwitz. At this point, the German Ur-texts (the diaries, the letters to her son Hans, Bonus-Jeep’s memoirs) are translated or nearly finished, and the “pre-text” is over 800 pages (to be used for the final text). Research on both world wars, Whilhemine society, on Weimar, on other women artists, on Goethe and the effects of the Bildung, on the Youth Movement, the satirical journals, and a variety of contextual matters relevant to her life are complete or underway. A meeting with the eminent historian of the First World War, Jay Winter, has given her much encouragement, and the wind is at her back! Thirteen years in and the end is finally in reach! 


Françoise Forster-Hahn gave the following lectures: “The Changing Incarnations of the National Gallery in Berlin: Symbol of Art and Nationhood before, during and after the Wars,” AAH2015 Annual Conference, University of East Anglia, Norwich, April 2015; “Der Kanon der modernen Kunst in Text und Bild: Meier-Graefes Entwicklungsgeschichte (1904) und die deutsche Jahrhundertausstellung 1906 in Berlin, Julius Meier-Graefe: Grenzgänger der Künste Conference, Berlin, Max Liebermann Haus, March 2015.  


Maria Makela, Professor of Visual Studies, California College of the Arts, gave a paper titled “Making Lemonade out of Lemons: Merz and Material Poverty,” at the Association of Art Historians Conference in Norwich, England, 11 April 2015, in the session on “Weimar’s ‘Other:’ Visual Culture in Germany after 1918. 


Nicholas Sawicki, Assistant Professor of Art History, Lehigh University, gave a paper at the HGCEA sponsored symposium “Charting Cubism Across Central and Eastern Europe” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in February 2015 and at “Decoding the Periodical: A Workshop in Slavic, East European and Eurasian Periodical Studies” at Princeton University in March 2015.